Some notes on new old work

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In 2010 I had a solo exhibition at Chrissie Cotter Gallery in Camperdown. The show was called “The White Room, or, Astronauts are not Excitable”. Its theme was space in the various ways that concept can be interpreted: space travel (I built a life-size replica of an early NASA space capsule), the spaces we find in our lives to do creative work, the spatial dynamics of minimal collage.

Since then I’ve made countless (mostly unexhibited/unpublished/not widely distributed) small collages, drawings, prints and zines through which I have explored my interests in life and art: utopia, photocopying, communism, cheesy television sci-fi, childhood/childish dreams, outdated encyclopaedias, obsolete printing techniques, stationery, amateurism, hobbies, modernism, punk, zines and so on.

In 2018 I am going to present this body of work in a new installation at Chrissie Cotter Gallery. Whereas the theme of my earlier CCG show was space, the theme of this one will be time: the time I’ve spent over the past decade on work (waged-labour) compared to the ‘non-work’ activity of art; how human cultures across the world describe experiences of temporality (uchronia, nostalgia, saudade), and the preoccupation in my art with obsolete materials.

The show will be called All or Nothing. I’m going to use this blog as a place to record my ideas about what it is that I’m doing.

 

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Digging 2 and Games

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Nearly ten years ago I wrote a zine called Digging. It was about some old road blocks that had been left in Callan Park, and SCA, and Kirkbride, and my grandparents in Ireland, and ancient monuments, and sadness, and Laika the space dog, and other things.

Last year I learned to ride a motorbike, and with this new mobility I visited Callan Park for the first time in a long time, and kept going back there. I took photos and spent some time writing my thoughts down. I kept finding myself thinking about a lot of the same things the first Digging was about, so I decided to make a second issue.

I’ll send you a copy for free if you email me your address: eternalproject (at) gmail (dot) com.

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This is the final weekend of Fully Automated Dexter Fletcher at 55 Sydenham Rd Gallery, Marrickville NSW 2204 AU. Members of Dexter Fletcher will be in attendance on both Saturday and Sunday, if you fancy a visit. We have made a game that you can play to make your very own Dexter Fletcher artwork.

Thanks to the Sticky Institute and 55 Sydenham Rd for everything you do.

 

Fully Automated Dexter Fletcher

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Dexter Fletcher
Fully Automated Dexter Fletcher (Beta Version)
55 Sydenham Rd Marrickville NSW 2204 AU
2/2/2018 – 18/2/2018

Fully Automated Dexter Fletcher is an enquiry into the basic philosophy of games. Is it possible to create a set of rules that can be followed in order to produce work indistinguishable from Dexter Fletcher’s existing artworks?

Dexter Fletcher is a mysterious revolutionary feminist art gang, current membership two.

Dexter Fletcher is a conscious attempt to recover the cooperative, non-commercial motivations of childhood and/or amateur art-making practices, and is also an investigation as to how these motivations may anticipate a post-capitalist society.

Adults and children sometimes have boards in their bedrooms or living-rooms on which they pin pieces of paper: letters, snapshots, reproductions of paintings, newspaper cuttings, original drawings, postcards. On each board all the images belong to the same language and all are more or less equal within it, because they have been chosen in a highly personal way to match and express the experience of the room’s inhabitant. Logically, these boards should replace museums.

Dexter Fletcher - two archives clash - searching for the young soul rebels

Some notes on sponsorship – redux

(Reposted from takecarezines.org)

Hey folks, I’m just dragging this up (with a few changes to the wording) from the bottom of the post before last where it was first published. In conversations I had on the weekend at the Sydney Anarchist Book Fair and Canberra Zine Emporium (thank you to the organisers of both events) people were overwhelmingly supportive of the idea of boycotting the MCA zine fair over the MCA’s relationship with Transfield, but there was some confusion about precisely what that relationship is. Creating confusion is a pretty good way of obscuring facts, but anyway: this is the information I have found with my limited internet searching abilities:

In a pay-walled article on ArtsHub, the MCA called our use of the word ‘sponsorship’ to describe their relationship with Transfield a “factual inaccurancy”, stating instead that Transfield are a ‘Corporate Member’.

‘Corporate Members’ are listed on the ‘Sponsorship’ page of the MCA website.

Transfield are listed on page 60 of the most recent (2012) MCA annual report in the section for ‘Sponsorship, Donations, Marketing and Public Relations’, as a ‘Corporate Member’.

The MCA are listed on the ‘Community Involvement – Sponsorships’ page of the Transfield website: “Transfield Holdings has been a corporate sponsor of the Museum of Contemporary Art since 2004.” (accessed 24/3/14, emphasis mine. Note that the Transfield domain name and the Transfield logo at the top of the web-page do not make a distinction between ‘Transfield Holdings’, ‘Transfield Services’ or ‘Transfield Foundation’.)

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So, the word ‘sponsorship’ seems to have a slippery definition, depending on when, how and by whom it is used. Clearly Transfield consider their corporate membership to be a variety of sponsorship. The MCA, perhaps, feels differently – although their own publicly accessible information on their sponsors etc is ambiguous. Whatever the difference (or lack of) between ‘sponsorship’ and ‘corporate membership’ in this case, the MCA and Transfield have a brand relationship. As the MCA website outlines, Corporate Membership provides an opportunity to:

“[a]lign with Australia’s leading contemporary arts brand and an exciting range of collections” and[d]evelop and enhance relationships with key clients and stakeholders”.

What would a bit of amateur research be without a visit to Wikipedia? From the entry on brand equity (or as it’s sometimes known, brand value):

Brand equity is a phrase used in the marketing industry which describes the value of having a well-known brand name, based on the idea that the owner of a well-known brand name can generate more money from products with that brand name than from products with a less well known name…”

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Cheers,

Emma